The Great Class of Dartmouth 1966
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Class of 1966

Dartmouth College 50th Reunion

Class Credit and Recognition

This year, the College is piloting a new recognition program with the Class of 1966. Celebrating the importance of the 50th reunion, we will recognize a broad array of areas as part of the overall Reunion Year giving campaign.

Guidelines for consideration for 50th reunion giving:

  1. Dartmouth’s highest priority is the Dartmouth College Fund. The Dartmouth annual fund raises $50 million each year - equal to $1 billion in endowment.  A majority of this is used to directly support current students for financial aid. (see chart below).  All levels of gifts to the Dartmouth College Fund are welcome.  We are also building a challenge pool for ’66 classmates to support students with a current use scholarship:

    Class of 1966 Dartmouth College Fund Scholars Program Challenge

    To maintain Dartmouth’s long tradition of need-blind admissions, contributions to financial aid are essential. Dartmouth is one of only a handful of colleges that are need-blind in admissions for domestic students and guarantees to meet 100 percent of demonstrated need for all four years. In other words, we guarantee a student will not be denied admission or have to forfeit staying at Dartmouth all four years, because they can’t afford it. The Class of 1966 feels strongly that supporting financial aid is integral to the Dartmouth experience.

    Therefore, the Class is hoping to fund as many Dartmouth College Fund Scholars as possible. A Dartmouth College Fund Scholar funds one student for one year with a contribution of $30,000 or more to the Dartmouth College Fund in support of financial aid. A member of the junior or senior class will be designated for one year as a recipient of a scholarship in your name. Such a gift will fully count towards Dartmouth class and Fund goals for the 50th Reunion.

    A generous donor in our class is hoping to inspire others to stretch to $30,000 and with that he will release another $30,000 with each such gift to this program.

    We hope that this way we can increase our support of financial aid in honor of our 50th reunion. However, not everyone in our class can stretch to make a $30,000 gift. Can one partner with a classmate to reach $30,000? Yes!

    Partner with one other classmate to join your gifts to financial aid and reach the $30,000 threshold.  Dartmouth made an exception to allow us to split a scholar and we feel this is a great approach for our class.

  2. Beyond the Dartmouth College Fund, we will also recognize gifts to the following areas. Unless noted, we welcome gifts of any level:

    ACADEMIC SUPPORT: Faculty and teaching -- the gifts represented below promote the intellectual and learning experience that are core to Dartmouth’s mission and are essential to maintaining our overall academic strength and vitality:

    Faculty: Gifts to name a professorship are the ultimate way of perpetuating the intellectual vigor and teaching excellence of Dartmouth. Endowed professorships start at $2.5m.  Current use funds restricted for faculty use are also important.

    Society of Fellows: Founded in 2014, the Society of Fellows aims to foster an intellectual community, bringing the very best postdoctoral fellows in the world to Dartmouth to teach and study for 2-3 years. The first five fellows were chosen from a pool of 1700+ candidates.
    (For more information, go to: http://www.dartmouth.edu/sof/)

    Thayer: The mission of the Thayer School is to expose every undergraduate to engineering and the applied sciences. Moreover, Thayer is a growing part of the undergraduate program and technological literacy is essential to a liberal arts education in the 21st Century especially at Dartmouth. Gifts to Thayer will be recognized.  (http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/)

    CAPITAL PROJECTS: New buildings that enhance the campus and renovations that perpetuate its culture is an essential part of Dartmouth’s mission. The following projects serve to maintain parts of our iconic past and promote a more competitive future:

    Moosilauke: Skip Battle ’66 has challenged the entire Dartmouth alumni body to match his incredibly generous $5 million gift. The plan is to replace the current, 1938 Lodge and create a Moosilauke for the next century. (For more information, go to: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~opdc/projects/moosilauke_ravine_lodge.html)

    Hood Museum: At the heart of Dartmouth’s arts and innovation program is the Hood Museum. Renowned not just for its collection but for its innovative work in bringing together scholarship, teaching, and art, the museum is slated for a major renovation in 2016-2017.  Gifts of $100,000 or more will be listed on the donor wall. (http://hoodmuseum.dartmouth.edu/about/)

    New Indoor Practice Facility: As the most northern Ivy, our field-sport athletes have a short outdoor season and have few indoor training options. The new field house will be a winter home for lacrosse, baseball, softball, soccer and football.
    Gift levels start at $100,000. (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~opdc/projects/indoorpractice.html)

    NEW PROGRAMS: Moving forward, innovating, creating, leading – it’s part of Dartmouth’s DNA. The following programs put our school and students at the forefront of fields and create leaders:

    DALI (Digital Arts, Leadership & Innovation Lab): Bringing together students from across multiple disciplines, the DALI community designs innovative technical solutions for a range of clients, including students, faculty, corporations and non-profits. (For more information, go to: http://dali.dartmouth.edu/)

    DEN (Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network): Founded in 2001, DEN fosters entrepreneurship across the entire Dartmouth community. (den.dartmouth.edu/)

    DP2 (Dartmouth Peak Performance): Dartmouth Peak Performance underscores Dartmouth’s commitment to the whole student-athlete. This innovative program integrates an array of resources to help varsity athletes achieve the highest levels of physical, intellectual, and personal growth.
    (View Peak Performance article here.)

    UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIENCE: Gifts in the following areas directly impact the lives of our undergraduates and enrich the experience of the current student population as well as classes to come:

    Dartmouth Housing Communities: As part of the heralded Moving Dartmouth Forward initiative, Dartmouth will create 6 house communities for the undergraduate population. Not only will the houses be the primary residence for students starting in their sophomore year, they will also be a focal point for activities (For more information, go to: dartmouth.edu/~orl/housing/communities/)

    Endowed Scholarship Funds: As stated above, we are committed to making Dartmouth accessible to the best and brightest, regardless of their ability to pay. Endowed scholarship funds support a student in perpetuity, guaranteeing that a Dartmouth education will be accessible for future generations. Endowed gifts for a named scholar start at $250,000.  Gifts to existing Endowed Scholarship Funds will also be recognized.

    Friends of Athletics: Dartmouth boasts national and Ivy League champions among its 35 Division I varsity teams and 33 club sports. Gifts to friends groups that support a varsity sport (including men’s rugby) are welcome and support the student athlete culture demonstrated by more than 75 percent of undergraduate students being involved in athletics. (dartmouthsports.com/giving)

  3. Participation & Endowed Giving: The Class participation will be based on gifts to any of the programs listed above.  What’s more, endowment gifts of $250,000 or more are payable over 5 years and will be fully recognized.  All other gifts must be received by June 30, 2016.


FAQs:

If you have additional questions, or want clarification of the answers given below, contact Cornelia Purcell at cornelia.purcell@dartmouth.edu or 1-603-646-1578.

Will a gift to Tuck or Geisel count?

We felt we could not include Tuck or Geisel in this pilot recognition program since they are separate graduate schools with their own programs, budgets and fundraising. Thayer is different; a large component of its program includes undergraduate education.  One can receive a BS from Thayer as a Dartmouth undergraduate, but one cannot major in medicine or business and receive their undergraduate degree from Tuck or Geisel.

How about gifts to team Friends and Athletic Sponsors programs?

Yes, those gifts will be counted in our class total. Our hope is that you will feel inspired to give to where you feel you can make the greatest impact and is meaningful to your Dartmouth experience. Dartmouth sponsors 35 Division 1 teams and nearly one out of four undergraduates participates in an intercollegiate sport. This is only possible through our team Friends and Athletic Sponsors program. These programs help the College develop some of the finest scholar-athletes and help provide them with the best possible athletic and academic experience. Friends support recruitment, training and travel for our student athletes. To give to a specific friends group visit: dartmouthsports.com/giving.

Will my gift to my fraternity be included?

No. When giving to your fraternity, it is a direct gift to that fraternity entity and not a gift to Dartmouth—fraternities are separate non-profits. The only possibility for a gift to impact the fraternity organizations is if there is a Dartmouth approved project that is benefiting a fraternity/ies.

I made a pledge to the Bunkhouse project—will that payment count?

Our ’66 Bunkhouse fundraising campaign occurred during the fiscal year ending June 30, 2015. All pledges and payments made in that period were counted in 2015, and will not be included in our Reunion Year giving comprehensive total.  New pledges or new gifts made between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 will be recognized.  Regardless, there will be a wonderful celebration of at the dedication of the ’66 Bunkhouse at Moosilauke on June 9.  All donors will be recognized on the plaque near the entrance.